The story of Abby Rose

Recently, it was Frances’s 9th birthday celebration, and it won’t surprise you to learn that she asked for a very special baby doll.

Categorized, I guess, technically, as a “reborn” doll — a hyper-realistic human baby representation — Abby Rose came from the Bradford Exchange.

She resembles a newborn baby so closely that, when we took her to Frances’s school to show her classmates, someone in the parking lot was truly shocked to discover that what I had been carrying was merely a doll.

Frances is very pleased with her choice.

(The pictures simply don’t do the doll justice.)

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Solutions

When I told her that her playroom was too messy to play in and that it needed to be cleaned, her solution was to warn others not to play in it…

We definitely weren’t on the same page.  šŸ˜‰

Sick kid

Frances has been home sick since Friday. 

We know that she is truly sick (as opposed to being merely disinclined to attend school) when she is still — and she actually has been on the sofa every day.

(We had to reschedule our first home visit with the behavioural therapist this week.)

At any rate, I have never before now seen her colouring in the same colouring book twice!

Thankfully, her illness has not altered all of her behaviour; she woke me up with the following question this morning: “Do ghosts need to breathe?”

Falling asleep

  
In my ongoing quest for sleep amid Frances’s sleep disturbance, I recently bought a book entitled, The Rabbit Who Wants to Fall Asleep by Carl-Johan ForssĆ©n Ehrlin. It aims to put the listener to sleep using words with “psychological purpose”.

So, I’ve pretty much resorted to hypnosis. Does that say “caring parent” or does it say “desperate”? šŸ˜‰

(While I was reading it to Frances, she got up off the bed and said, “That’s making me tired.” She then left the room.)

Dolls, dolls and more dolls

 
One day recently, Frances and I were going to the toy store because she wanted to spend her allowance. Seeing as how she had bought a baby doll the week before, I insisted that she not buy one on this trip to the store.

I know that I’ve spoken about her intense, uh, focus on dolls of every type, so it won’t be too much of a shock to learn that she actually bought horse figurines (i.e., horse dolls). Well, she didn’t, in fact, buy a baby doll, so that’s something.

The apple gameĀ 

At the age of 26 months or so, Frances went from speaking less than the average child her age to using compound sentences, correct adjective-adverb distinction, and story-telling, in an incredibly short period of time. (It truly seemed to occur just about overnight.)

Fast forward to March 4, 2010, when Frances, two months away from turning three, is talking about the “apple game”.

Me: What is it?

Frances: It’s where I go get an apple and throw it at something.

Me: Uh, no. No, we’re not going to play that game. (By this point, she is running to get the stool that she uses to reach the apples.)

Frances: You should watch me, Mummy. It’s very cute.

Drawing

Frances drew this while looking at a picture of same — it’s pretty much identical — which kind of shocked the whole family.