Boundless energy

If I’m not mistaken, around the time of middle school is when children seem to slow down. They stop “playing” at recess, and instead they stand around talking with one another or in groups. They may go for walks. It’s quite a change when it happens.

This hasn’t happened yet for Frances. She still plays, but yesterday she said that she might only play at home from now on in order to fit in. (More on this later.)

Her bouncy energy hasn’t diminished any either, and she will still skip, instead of walking, up to someone. I love it.

Yesterday, she returned from a sleepover (at the house of a great family that I’ve mentioned before): they know Frances very well, and the older son has Aspergers.

She had gone over on Saturday immediately after her riding lesson. I’m guessing that she was her bouncy and enthusiastic self when an activity was suggested because the mum said, “Frances, you just got off a horse!”

It was said with jocularity, and Frances giggled when she told me about it.

I do hope she retains this energy for as long as possible. Speaking as a mother of “advanced age”* (🙄),I’m always hoping for more energy.

Overcoming inertia gets harder for me by the week! 😂

* that’s how a brochure, that I had received from my doctor while pregnant with Frances, actually referred to me. I was in my 30s. 🤷‍♀️

Interview with Frances, Aged 12 years, 5 months

Current job?
~Student. I’m 12
Dream job?
~Anything that makes me enough money to run a Friesian and Lippizaner care centre attached to a vet’s office where my friends can come and ride my horses for free. Not Mummy
Favorite food?
~Salad
Favorite type of cat?
~Calico
Favorite candy?
~Anything sour
Favourite ice cream?
~Mint chocolate chip
Your favourite colour(s)?
~Black, lime green, white, and gold
Favourite holiday?
~My birthday, duh
Night owl or Early Bird?
~Night owl
Favourite day?
~Holidays! Sunday
Tattoos?
~I’m 12
Like to cook?
~Yes, whatever doesn’t burn the house down
Can you drive a stick shift?
~I’ve been shown how to drive a tractor
Your vehicle colour?
~Black
Do you like vegetables?
~Yes, of course!
Do you wear glasses?
~Yes, I think that’s kind of obvious
Glasses you wear?
~Black Raybans. (Can I wear Gucci?)
Favourite Perfume?
~Chanel No. 5
Favorite season?
~Winter
Favourite music?
~Billie Eilish
Favourite kind of movie?
~Horror
Favourite show?
~Stranger Things
Favourite author?
~Stephen King
Favourite graphic novel?
~Smile by R. Telgemeier
Favourite activity?
~English and Western horseback riding
Pets?
~
Pink Cup Cat, Pink Cup Dog, Pink Cup Pony
Where do you want to live when you grow up?
~L.A.
Favourite restaurant?
~East Side Mario’s

#asd #aspergers #autism

Lego in motion

Not only has Frances been nonstop energy 18+ hours per day since she was 13 months old, she has always sought or invented alternative methods of transportation.

At the age of three, she began asking for a “motorised vehicle,” but we’ve always thought that she moved around enough without the assistance of a motor. The last thing we needed was a way for her to move around more or faster! 😂

At any rate, using her imagination has resulted in great things.

In the photo, she is eight years old.

What I love about this photo is not only does it show her cleverness, it proves that “toys” are what the child makes of them. Frances hasn’t played in a typical way nor has she usually used toys in the way that the manufacturer intended; however, she has always found ways to occupy herself and to learn and to have fun.

Frances invents vehicles

Please, do not say that!

Every summer, we have the opportunity to have a support worker, through a local non-profit organization, take Frances out into the community for fun activities and maybe to socialize.

It is, of course, considered respite for the family, and we’ve never told Frances. I really do think of it as a great opportunity for her to do the things for which I seem to lack energy these days.

At any rate, Frances met her worker, Aida, today. All week, my 12-year-old daughter has been referring to her as “the woman you pay to take me off your hands for a few hours every week.” 🤦‍♀️

I’ve actually had to ask her to stop saying that in public! She is expressing her dry sense of humour by highlighting what she thinks is the bottom line that nobody talks about.

And all morning, I kept my fingers crossed that Frances wouldn’t say that to Aida during their outing.

(Mental note: Ask Frances not to say that to Aida.)

“I’m going through changes…”

It would seem that my posts have slowed down…But, don’t worry, I haven’t abandoned my posting. (Haha, see what I did there?)

Life does get busy here, but I do want to write more often. This is my goal!

Anyway, I’ve been wanting to share something that I’ve just noticed and which I think is cute: At the barn, there’s a policy/tradition/point of etiquette that, before opening an arena door, the person seeking entrance will loudly say, “door” and someone else will say “okay” or “no” in response.

(This avoids startling the horses and riders and also avoids someone getting run over by a cantering horse that’s really riding the rails. But that’s not the cute part; I digress.)

Recently, I’ve noticed that, before entering a room at home, Frances will knock and say “door” loudly; if she doesn’t hear “no”, she’ll go in.

It’s probably a good idea. 🤔 But I do believe that I will have to think about a way to encourage her to not open the door unless she hears “okay.” That would be more helpful for her.

I’ve also noticed a really very significant change: Frances, who has now turned twelve, will play outside! For hours!! By HERSELF!! This is absolutely huge — the trifecta that we’d long wondered about, waiting to see if it would happen — and I just can’t adequately express it.

Yay, Frances!!

#asd #aspergers #autism

On Valentine’s Day

I almost let a holiday go by without mentioning my inimitable 11-year-old’s reaction to it this year.

Frances: There’s too much “love” involved — and happiness. And pink. Blech.

This is a first. She used to enjoy Valentine’s Day (although it was probably access to the candy, now that I think about it).

I can’t wait to see what she says tomorrow… It’s my birthday. 😬

Happy New Year!

Each year, I end up writing about Frances’s reaction to the festive season. This year, there was a noticeable increase in stress for her, as school finished up and decorations appeared, compared to other years.

There is always some degree of stress for her; however, we were seeing daily meltdowns at least 3x per day, and I was tempted to pull her out of the school concert.

In the end, we had a great, exciting Christmas. Frances received a stack of Breyer horses as tall as she is. It was, overall, just a delightful experience.

I do think we have to do a better job next year of shielding Frances from stressful situations. I mean, we did do so, but we’ve more clearly identified triggers as of this past holiday.

She recently said to me:

“Mummy, I don’t like uncertainty in my life. I run on a schedule…”

How insightful she is! Thankfully, horse riding is year-long, so that part of her schedule remained very close to the norm for her. In fact, like most “horse” people we know, Frances and I were there more often because of the break from school.

Picture of pony

One notable difference this holiday from my perspective was that, at the Christmas dinner, she spoke eloquently about her interest in writing and her ideal projects. She actually sounded like an adult! I have to remind myself at those times that she is only 11 years old.

Anyway, I hope to provide more updates and anecdotes this year than last: family emergencies and some serious health issues for me meant less writing.

But now that I’m back up and running, so to speak, do expect more from A Pink Cup 🙂

Purposeful activity…

I have to do a lot of convincing to get Frances on board with the idea of going to social groups. Usually, she will say things like, “I don’t mind groups; I just don’t like the people.” Though it sounds funny to us, she is quite serious.

She always has at least one group ongoing.

Of this group, the one that she has been going to weekly for several years, she says that she doesn’t like the people or the activities. We actually don’t give her the option of not attending. At this point, opportunities to socialize are opportunities to learn and to hone developing skills.

Also, at least once per year, her name comes to the top of the waiting list for a social group at the local children’s hospital (whose primary focus appears to be autism and ASD).

This year, the interventionists of the upcoming session asked if they could interview Frances on her own to determine her suitability for a group that starts this week.

I explained that she probably wouldn’t agree to an interview without me present and that the prospect of joining a group would not motivate her to be independent in this respect.

So, I had permission to be in the room while the interview was conducted. Her answers were not entirely predictable: she thought she had some friends (she doesn’t say this consistently), she liked to be on her own during recesses and lunch (she didn’t mention that she doesn’t know how to not be alone at these times), and she didn’t find this kind of group very helpful at any rate.

Near the end of the session, she truthfully said, “I’m really not much of a people person.”

Now, I completely understand this: she says it more often these days, and I believe her.

As clever and as smart as she is, however, she doesn’t believe Pink Cup Dad or myself when we tell her that social groups develop her social skills, that when she starts practicing and using her social skills she may enjoy interacting with people more than she does at the moment.

The reasoning behind development of these groups is that, as kids take social risks and interact, there are professionals on hand to intervene in order to start interactions, sustain interactions, and even end interactions. The children learn about cues and how to read them. They learn about what subjects are typically okay to discuss in different situations.

Personally, I like the groups even though it’s a struggle to get her to go; and, in this case, the parents will have their own concurrent group, too, which is a new development in the programming.

I jumped in at the end of the interview only to ask Frances if she had any questions for her interviewer about, perhaps, group size, the attendees, the activities or the expectations.

I also reminded her that there are times when she feels very lonely and that, perhaps, she could learn how to be less lonely by joining this one group.

I think that’s what did it; when asked a third time, she said she would give it a try. Yay!

The only downside is that this will mean that our time, from Tuesday to Saturday, will be busy: private group on Tuesday, horse riding lessons on Wednesday, hospital groups on Thursday, violin and flute lessons on Friday, and volunteering at the barn on Saturday. (She starts violin lessons on Friday just before her sister’s flute lesson.)

I’m actually starting to consider Monday to be a break! Except, of course, throughout the day during the week, there are appointments — one or two per day — that keep the girls and myself busy.

But it’s all good — it means someone (either Frances, Pink Cup Sister, myself, or, rarely, Pink Cup Dad) has access to a resource from which she or he will likely benefit.