Was time made up…?

Frances: Was time made up by humans? I still haven’t figured out what we are. Until I figure it out, I’m probably going to be behind in math.

Advertisements

An instrument of communication 

A recent candid class photo

From about the age of four, and the start of junior kindergarten, the abacus became the go-to toy for Frances when leaving home.

She could count to 100 by 5s and 10s, as well as add and subtract, and it was a means by which you might reach her in conversation because she might demonstrate, without eye contact, if you asked.

Nowadays, she is very protective of her abaci, though she doesn’t travel with one very often anymore. (She will take her stuffed bunny which has been with her non-stop for the past two years.)

Letter perfect

When she was 18 months, it seemed hard to get Frances’s attention. It always had been, but because of her interest in letters, I ended up noticing more acutely.

She carried around a bag of Bananagrams (letter tiles) all the time. She would shove it into my hands, and I would say, “Oh, you want me to make words for you?”

We would sit on the floor in the living room, and I would empty the bag of letter tiles. Then, I’d arrange letters into small words and read them to her.

By 24 months, she identified all letters and knew if they were upside down or sideways. 

Eventually, though our letter game continued, she needed me less. One day, I said, “Are you making a word?” (In a video of this conversation, I ask her many times.) Finally, she answered, without looking up, “Letters make words.”

From that point on, I was a little uneasy about the fact that she seemed deaf so much of the time, yet she COULD hear me as she clearly demonstrated in the video. (We knew that her hearing was fine as she had been tested.) It was very confusing.

When she was 27 months, while at the ophthalmologist, I explained that the picture set was unnecessary: she could handle the letters for her exam. She was able to name all the letters that she could see, and the technician was shocked. 

I explained that she wasn’t reading: Frances just knew the letters. What was even more unusual was that she had an incredible attention span with letters and could sit for an hour with her tiles (and then books).

By the age of three, though letters were still a big deal for her, Frances’s intense interest included numbers. 

By the numbers

 
I chose to post this panel because it illustrates some important aspects of Frances’s life: 

(1) math and numbers — she is very good and very fast at math; it is her favourite subject, and she has great facility with numbers in general;

(2) rules — she is rules-based in her behaviour. Rules are important to her in that she needs to learn them in order to interact with others, but also in the sense that her behaviour is motivated by rules. She often verifies rules in her questions;

and,

(3) questions — it is the means by which she communicates with others, and a fascinating use of language;

(4) danger — when not climbing or bolting, Frances has a keen sense of danger.